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Frequently Asked Questions

Do the courts get prospective jurors’ names from voter registration rolls?  

Must I choose a political party when I register to vote?

Does being “No Party Affiliation” mean I can vote for anyone in a primary election?  

What is a Universal Primary Contest?

Do I have to re-register to vote for every election?  

I lost my voter card. Can I still vote?

What identification do I need to vote?

What happens if I forget to bring my ID to the polls?  

What is a “provisional ballot”?  

Can I bring my children with me to the polling place?

Can I change my political party at the polls?  

If I’m physically impaired in some way, can I bring someone with me to help me vote?

What happens if I make a mistake on my ballot?  

What is an “under-vote”?  

What is an “over-vote”?

Where can I get a sample ballot?  

Can I bring my marked sample ballot to the polls? 

Can I talk on my cell phone while I’m in the voting booth?

What percentage comprises a win in the primary election?

There is a polling place closer to my home than the one shown on my voter information card. Why can’t I vote in the polling place that’s closer to my home?  

I own property in Holmes County but I don’t live here. Why can’t I vote here? 

How may I become a poll worker?  

I've been convicted of a felony but served my time. Can I register to vote?  

How can I find out if my civil rights have been restored?

If I have more questions, where can I get answers?

 

  

Questions and Answers 

Do the courts get prospective jurors’ names from voter registration rolls?

No. In 1992 the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles took on the responsibility to begin building a database of prospective jurors, based on applicants for driver’s licenses and Florida identification cards. The database was to be fully operational by 1998. Since 1998, the DHSMV has been required to provide the jury list to the clerk of the circuit court in each county on an annual basis. Back to Top

Must I choose a political party when I register to vote?

No, you're not required to choose a political party
. If you do not choose a party, you will be registered as “No Party Affiliation” (NPA). Voters registered as NPA may not vote for party candidates (Democrat, Republican, Libertarian Party, etc.) in a primary election but may vote for nonpartisan candidates (such as school board and judicial candidates) and issues in a primary election. Back to Top

Does being “No Party Affiliation” mean I can vote for anyone in a primary election?

No. 
Because Florida is a closed-primary state, only the political parties have primary elections. The primary elections are considered to be “nominating” elections, and you will have to be registered as a member of the party whose primary election you wish to vote in. There is an exception, however: All voters may vote in a primary election for nonpartisan races, such as school board members, judges and referenda. The only other exception is for a Universal Primary Contest. Back to Top

What is a Universal Primary Contest?

If all candidates in a race have the same party affiliation and the winner will be determined by the outcome of the primary election, then all qualified voters, regardless of party affiliation, may vote in the primary election for that office. Back to Top

Do I have to re-register to vote for every election?

No, 
but you must notify the Supervisor of Elections Office if you move or change your name.  Back to Top

I lost my voter card. Can I still vote?

Yes.
 The voter identification cards issued prior to January 1, 2006 are no longer valid for identification for voting and are no longer issued. When you registered to vote, you are issued a “voter information card,” which simply provides information to you about your voter registration. Florida law requires photo and signature identification for voting.  Back to Top

What identification do I need to vote?

For voting, you must have photo and signature identification, such as a driver’s license or Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, or you may use two separate types of identification as long as one has a signature and one has a photograph. The following types of identification may be used according to Florida law:               

  • Florida driver’s license
  • Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
  • United States passport
  • Debit or credit card
  • Military identification
  • Student identification
  • Retirement center identification
  • Neighborhood association identification
  • Public assistance identification
  • Veteran health identification card issued by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs
  • License to carry a concealed weapon or firearm issued pursuant to s. 790.06
  • Employee identification card issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the Federal Government, the state, a county, or a municipality.
  •  Back to Top

    What happens if I forget to bring my ID to the polls?

    You’ll be entitled to vote a provisional ballot.  Back to Top

    What is a “provisional ballot”?


    A provisional ballot is a conditional ballot, the validity of which will be determined by the Canvassing Board. The voter may provide written evidence supporting his or her eligibility to vote to the Elections Office no later than 5 p.m. on the second day following the election.

    If a voter votes a provisional ballot because he or she did not have the proper identification, the ballot will be counted if the voter's signature on the Provisional Ballot Voter's Certificate and Affirmation matches the signature on the voter's registration record and if the voter voted in the proper precinct.  Back to Top

    Can I bring my children with me to the polling place?

    Yes, 
    you may bring your children with you. Bringing your children with you helps to educate them on the importance of voting. Back to Top

    Can I change my political party at the polls?

    No. 
    Registration books close 29 days before an election, so party changes must be done prior to the book closing date in order to be in effect for that election. Back to Top

    If I’m physically impaired in some way, can I bring someone with me to help me vote?

    Yes, 
    you may but you are not required to. If you need assistance, two of our poll workers from different political parties (if available) will assist you as needed, or you may bring someone to help you. Anyone who assists you other than two election officials must sign an oath prior to providing assistance. We also have one touch-screen voting machine in each polling place capable of allowing disabled voters to vote, secretly and independently, without assistance. Back to Top

    What happens if I make a mistake on my ballot?

    Tell the poll workers that you have made a mistake. You will be issued a new ballot in exchange for your “spoiled” ballot, which will be sealed in an envelope and never opened. You may have up to two replacement ballots if you make a mistake on your first ballot, but only one of them will count.Back to Top

    What is an “under-vote”?

    An under-vote occurs when the voter does not mark any choice for or against a measure or candidate. Back to Top

    What is an “over-vote”?

    An “over-vote” occurs when a voter marks more than the allowable choices or candidates for a particular office or measure. Back to Top

    Where can I get a sample ballot?

    Sample ballots are published in the local newspaper before each election. We post sample ballots on our Web site, too, and copies will be available in our office.  Back to Top

    Can I bring my marked sample ballot to the polls?

    Yes, 
    as long as you do not display it for others to see and do not leave it in the polling place. Use of a sample ballot is encouraged. Back to Top

    Can I talk on my cell phone while I’m in the voting booth?

    No. 
    Voters should silence or turn off their cell phones prior to entering a polling place. Except as provided for voters who need assistance to vote, it is unlawful for voters to speak with anyone while in the voting booth. (Section 101.51, Florida Statutes) Back to Top

    What percentage comprises a win in the primary election?
    The partisan candidate receiving the highest number of votes will be nominated. In nonpartisan races -- such as school board and judicial races -- if no candidate receives a majority of the votes, the top two candidates will be voted on in the general election. Back to Top

    There is a polling place closer to my home than the one shown on my voter information card. Why can’t I vote in the polling place that’s closer to my home
    ?

    Each voter in Florida must be registered and vote in the precinct of his or her residence - not the precinct where the voter owns property, is employed, or where it’s most convenient to the voter’s place of business (Section 101.045, Florida Statutes).  Residence is determined both by the individual's intent plus physical presence. The voter's precinct of residence is where he or she lives, spends his or her nights, keeps his or her clothes, etc. A voter may own many houses; but under the law, only one house may be his or her permanent legal residence. Back to Top

    I own property in Holmes County but I don’t live here. Why can’t I vote here?

    Each voter in Florida must be registered and vote in the precinct of his or her residence - not the precinct where the voter owns property, is employed, or where it’s most convenient to the voter’s place of business (Section 101.045, Florida Statutes).  Residence is determined both by the individual's intent plus physical presence. The voter's precinct of residence is where he or she lives, spends his or her nights, keeps his or her clothes, etc. A voter may own many houses; but under the law, only one house may be his or her permanent legal residence. Back to Top

    How may I become a poll worker?

    Contact us for details and an application. Poll workers must be registered to vote in the county in which they serve. Back to Top

    I've been convicted of a felony but served my time. Can I register to vote?
    Yes, you can register to vote if your civil rights have been restored. Back to Top

    How can I find out if my civil rights have been restored?

    To find out if your rights have been restored, contact:

    The Office of Executive Clemency
    2601 Blair Stone Road, Building C 
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-2450
    Phone (850) 488-2952, Fax (850) 488-0695 
    E-mail: ClemencyWeb@fcor.state.fl.us

    Or visit the Office of Executive Clemency's Web site at https://www.fcor.state.fl.us/Back to Top

     If I have more questions, where can I get answers?

    Please feel free to call or visit our office at any time. We’re located in the basement of the Holmes County Courthouse:

    Holmes County Supervisor of Elections
    201 N. Oklahoma St. Suite 102, Bonifay, FL 32425
    Phone (850) 547-1107, Fax (850) 547-4168
    E-mail: debbie@holmeselections.com

    Back to Top